Interview Questions?


#1

Can you please advise ?

What does it mean and what does it take to be a great UX designer?
What are the current challenges that you face as a UX designer?
What is a recent project that you were challenged by, and tell us how you approached the problem?
What is your design process? Describe what methods you follow?
Give me some examples of your experience dealing with usability studies, eye-tracking study, field study, or focus groups.
What would you say will be the next big trend in the UX Design industry?
What is your approach to making websites and platforms accessible to all user groups, including users with visual, hearing, and motor disabilities?


#2

Can you give more detail on what you’re asking. It looks to me like everyone’s answers will be different. Are these questions that you have been asked?


#3

Yes it had been asked.


#4

Yes i totally agree as everyone’s view will be different, that’s the reason i posted here.


#5

While we wait for others to chime in, how about telling us what you’ve come up with so far? Then we can help you refine your answers.


#6

Apologies, I’m a bit confused - are you looking for our answers to your questions, or are you looking for us to add more questions to your list?


#7

Sorry for the confusion i am looking for Answers - Doug.


#8

Well, your answers to these questions will inevitably be different than mine. I’m not sure my answers would be helpful, and like @Piper_Wilson, I’d be interested in hearing your thoughts and helping to refine them. Here are a few things to consider when answering these questions:

1. What does it mean and what does it take to be a great UX designer?

This question is as much about your design philosophy as anything else. What do you see as the central role of UX, and how is that achieved? For some, a great UX designer is one who’s capable of manipulating designs and users to increase a company’s bottom line. For others, a great UXer is one who stands up for the user in the face of unreasonable demands from internal stakeholders. There’s not a right or wrong an answer here, so long as you can back up your thinking.

2. What are the current challenges that you face as a UX designer?

This is another highly personal question, and the interviewer here is trying to understand your strengths and weaknesses, and also what you’re doing to counter areas where you could use improvement. My biggest challenge is that as a a self-taught UXer, I constantly doubt my own abilities. I try to assuage these by learning something new every day. Not only does it help fill knowledge gaps, but it reminds me that I am very capable in what I do.

3. What is a recent project that you were challenged by, and tell us how you approached the problem?

Your interviewer is looking for an example of the most difficult work you take on, and also how you rally to solve a problem that you feel may above your abilities. Are you a team builder that brings in others to help? Are you a researcher that hits the books to find your own solution? Whatever you say here, be sure to tell not only what the project was, but what problem in particular caused you to stumble, and be prepared to list the steps you took to succeed.

4. What is your design process? Describe what methods you follow?

Everyone’s process is going to vary a little bit. What matters is that you have one, and that you are able to explain the process and why it’s successful. If you’re looking for a place to start, the user-centric design process is a good jumping off point.

5. Give me some examples of your experience dealing with usability studies, eye-tracking study, field study, or focus groups.

Your interviewer wants to know the depth of your experience with UX tests. If you’ve done these, great! If you haven’t, that may be okay - so long as you can demonstrate some knowledge of what each is, the benefits and drawbacks of each, and how you’d go about learning more about them to implement them.

6. What would you say will be the next big trend in the UX Design industry?

This is a test of your reading to keep up with the UX world. Again, your answer here doesn’t matter as much as your ability to explain it.

7. What is your approach to making websites and platforms accessible to all user groups, including users with visual, hearing, and motor disabilities?

Your interviewer wants to know about your approach to UX design for accessibility. If you don’t have experience with this, I suggest taking a crash course. I teach a class on SkillShare about UX Design for Accessibility. You can get the class, and two free months of SkillShare premium, here. (Excuse the shameless plug).

With all that in mind, what are your responses to the questions?


#9

Hi dougcollins,

Many thanks for your kind response for all the answers and its much appreciated.

Really helpful.

Cheers Vel


#10

Hey Vel, it’d be great if you could give us your thoughts as well. It’ll be helpful for others in the future (and feels less like we’re doing your homework :wink: )


#11

Hawk & Doug,

Yes i will update my views too sure.

thanks Vel


#12
  1. What does it mean and what does it take to be a great UX designer?

A strong UI/UX designer is a bit of an anthropologist and understands the cognitive sciences behind principles such as sticky recognition being better than recall or nudges being a key element to behavior change. Its critical to be able to deconstruct a design and qualify the poor or effective aspects with scientific/behavioral evidence. Often, designers argue with emotions, which is largely effective.

  1. What are the current challenges that you face as a UX designer?

Appearance of GUI elements: Standard is safe (and tested and better in general).
Don’t tease your users with elements that appear to be GUI elements (but aren’t).
Consider your information architecture before blindly going for patterns like hamburger menu and infinite scroll.
A conversational tone in forms can lessen the pain considerably.
Communicate with clients and understand their motivations as best as you can.

  1. What is a recent project that you were challenged by, and tell us how you approached the problem?

• Initiative — You step up and take action without being asked. You look for opportunities to make a difference.
• Creativity — You are an original thinker and have the ability to go beyond traditional approaches.
• Resourcefulness — You adapt to new/difficult situations and devise ways to overcome obstacles.
• Analytical Thinking — You can use logic and critical thinking to analyze a situation.
• Determination — You are persistent and do not give up easily.
• Results-Oriented — Your focus is on getting to the desired outcome — solving the problem.

  1. What is your design process? Describe what methods you follow?
    Discovery: The customer shares the high-level requirements and business goals with the team. This stage involves a customer, a sales representative, a business analyst (BA) and a UX designer. At the end of the stage, the provided deliverables will be documented basic functionality and business requirements.
    Analysis / Research: BA and UX expert analyze the requirements, define the target audience and user personas, conduct market and competition research to make sure the future product is viable and competitive. The artefacts at this point are information architecture and basic interface structure for the product.
    Prototyping: Based on the gathered and approved information, our UX experts build basic wireframes for the product, while BA writes the functional specifications for the product. Software engineers and UI designers are engaged for occasional consulting. Hence, wireframes and functional specifications are the deliverables of the prototyping stage.
    Testing & Improvements: Our experts conduct preliminary usability testing and enhance the prototypes based on the user feedback. What the client gets as the artefacts is polished wireframes that meet the user requirements and industry standards, ready to be turned into UI designs.

  2. Give me some examples of your experience dealing with usability studies, eye-tracking study, field study, or focus groups.

Your interviewer wants to know the depth of your experience with UX tests. If you’ve done these, great! If you haven’t, that may be okay - so long as you can demonstrate some knowledge of what each is, the benefits and drawbacks of each, and how you’d go about learning more about them to implement them.

  1. What would you say will be the next big trend in the UX Design industry?

Content-Centered Experiences
Smarter Personalized User Experiences
Time-Saving Design Features
Voice-Activated Interfaces
Augmented Reality
Bio-metric Authentications

  1. What is your approach to making websites and platforms accessible to all user groups, including users with visual, hearing, and motor disabilities?

disabilities use to browse the Web and the barriers they encounter due to poor design. It helps developers, designers, and others to understand the principles for creating accessible websites, web applications, browsers, and other web tools