I had a UX design interview today

It was scary, I found it hard to get my words out, the nerves where out of control but I managed to do an okay job… I think.

The first 40 minutes was a formal interview and as I spoke my brain was racing faster than I can speak and I can talk pretty fast so it was like a verbal machine gun going off.

We went through my printed CV that they hadn’t seen because recruiters send over formatted CVs so lesson learned, always send over a nice designer CV as well. And then we looked at my portfolio.

The portfolio was only two projects, that I had recently completed; a dashboard redesign and a class room timer. I structured each project into:

Project summary
Problem
Thinking
Research
Challenges
Solutions
Deliverables
Summary of what was done and learned

This seemed to go down well. This was then followed by a Challenge where they wanted to see my process. I sketched, made notes, tried to understand the brief and then did a couple of things I had learned in workshops and courses to try to show my final idea.

This was followed by a Q/A and I’m feeling good about how it went! Fingers crossed.

Have you had any interview experiences recently? If so share some insights and let me know how it went.

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I’ve been able to line up an interview or 2 a week for the past few months, which is also to say that I have not been able to land a new job.

They all “seem to go well” more or less. I can usually get to a 2nd or 3rd interview (might be a portfolio presentation, whiteboard test, or a talk with the team). I usually consider it lucky if I get feedback, though frequently the feedback seems too idiosyncratic to be useful. I’ve been focusing on UX Architect and Interaction Design positions. (little background: started in 2013 as a developer; since 2014 I worked across Project Management and UX, particularly IxD in a digital marketing and development agency).

It’s been an interesting experience and produced a lot of learning opportunities - but the bulk of it feels like non-productive work. I’m not a professional job-applyer. What does feel more productive is networking to create a design community for my city, aside from the sporadic theme-based meetups. So while this feels more productive, it’s quite different from my IxD work. What to do with such a community is a question I hadn’t yet seriously approached. I have 50 some members with not much to say :smiley:

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What would you say you find it easiest to speak about? Do you have anything that you feel forced talking about?

I only ask because I come from a background in Design/Front-End Dev and found myself doing a lot of generic design work as well a small amount of front end code. I ended up building a passion for UX and also love designing User Interfaces but couldn’t sell myself as this, I would always lean on the things I had been doing in work; code, email marketing etc.

I think it’s important to find the things that interest you enough so you can talk about them easily. When ever I would talk about code I would seize up and stumble but when I talk about design the passion shows.

They seem to like passion. So I guess my question is, was there anything in the interview that seemed forced? If so you probably need to focus/find something more suited to your interests and passions, do a couple of portfolio pieces and then talk your heart out about it.

Another thing that they seemed to like was that I just wanted to grow and learn as much as I can.

I hope that helps you land the next one!

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Nice one @kieronkevan – good luck.

The best advice I’ve read about handling an interview is to think of the interviewer as a client, not an employer.

From the other side of the fence (someone that interviews a lot of people) my advice would be to admit your nerves, be human, and speak from your heart. I’m much more likely to hire someone that I can connect with on this level.

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Thanks for this. I think that is spot on.

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I GOT THE JOB!!! My UX career starts in two weeks. I’m looking forward to sharing the journey and learning as much as I can about the different aspects of User Experience.

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That is AMAZING! I’m so pumped for you! Nice one.

Looking forward to hearing how it all goes.

Everybody faces this kind of situation. When we become nervous, sometimes we make mistakes or we face hesitation. But, a pool of confidence should be with us. Your interview story is nice. Force doesn’t matter if we are confident.

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I think the confidence shines through the nervousness if you know what you’re talking about and have the passion. I’m looking forward to getting started and keeping you all updated.

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